Cremation

The Cremation service

The cremation service can be religious or non-religious or you may choose to have no service at all. Any service that takes place must be carried out within the time allowed for each funeral and not impact on the funeral before or after. The duration of the service varies between crematoria but is usually 30 minutes, which allows time for people to enter the chapel, hold the service and leave. If you feel you will need a longer period of time, it is possible to book the following service time for an additional charge.

If you prefer, you can hold a service in a separate place, like a church, followed by a ceremony at the crematorium. You can arrange for your own minister to carry out the service or your funeral director can help you find a suitable person.

The Committal

The end of the service is known as the committal. During the committal the coffin is usually hidden from view by curtains or taken out of the chapel. If you are arranging a funeral and would prefer the coffin to remain on view until everyone has left, we can arrange that for you. When the service is over, we are on hand to lead close family out of the chapel, followed by the other mourners. You will have an opportunity to look at the floral tributes and the family will have time to thank people for coming.

The cremation will always take place on the same day as the service, usually within a few hours. The coffin is taken into a room where the nameplate is checked. An identity card is then attached to the cremator where the coffin is placed and is kept with the ashes until they leave the crematorium. The coffin is always cremated with the body in accordance with the Cremation Code of Practice. The code also requires that nothing must be removed from the coffin after it has been received from the chapel and that it must be placed in the cremator exactly as received.

After the Service

Once the cremation service has taken place we are on hand to go through the options available for you to lay the ashes to rest and choose a memorial for the person who has died. Gardens of remembrance are the most popular choice, with the cremated remains interred in a crematorium garden of remembrance, a tranquil garden setting designed for quiet thought and reflection. Other options include having the ashes laid to rest in a family grave in a churchyard or cemetery.

Retaining the Ashes

There are many options available for further processing of ashes such as into glass or other keepsakes. See our ashes page for more information.